Non-fungible tokens have been widely adopted across a variety of industries. The fast-developing NFT ecosystem of technical and commercial innovation is aimed at the promise of bridging physical world concepts of uniqueness and scarcity with the digital world. As with all forms of technical innovation, NFTs pose unique legal challenges to participants in this ecosystem.

Perkins Coie is pleased to announce that it has obtained no-action relief from the Securities and Exchange Commission Staff that clears the way for its client IMVU Inc., to sell VCOIN, a blockchain-based digital asset, as a transferable non-security to its users worldwide.

IMVU is the world’s largest avatar-based social platform with a global network

Privacy-enabling cryptocurrencies, commonly known as privacy coins, are enhanced versions of early cryptocurrencies that were developed to protect the financial privacy of individuals and businesses alike. Each privacy coin leverages innovative mechanisms that provide privacy, encryption, and security to its users. Alongside their positive effects, however, these mechanisms have raised an important compliance question:

Arizona’s financial technology (“fintech”) sandbox (“Sandbox”), the first of its kind in the United States, has been open for several months and has accepted three participants.  A month after the program’s launch, Arizona’s Attorney General announced his approval of the first participant, payment platform Omni Mobile, Inc.[1]  Two other companies providing consumer lending services, Sweetbridge NFP, Ltd. and Grain Technology, Inc., joined Omni as Sandbox participants shortly thereafter.[2]  Arizona’s Sandbox may serve as a helpful illustration of what entrepreneurs can expect in Arizona (should they also wish to participate in the Sandbox) as well as in other states that decide to implement similar programs.[3]  To that end, this client update provides an overview of regulatory sandboxes generally, Arizona’s Sandbox, and potential future developments.
Continue Reading Fintech Regulatory Sandboxes: Update on Arizona’s Sandbox and Other Developments

On August 7, Judge Richard Seeborg of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California denied in part a motion to dismiss (the “Order”) sought by the defendants in In Re Tezos Securities Litigation (the “Tezos Case”). Among other important insights, the Order’s reasoning illustrates the potentially broad reach of the U.S. federal securities laws to blockchain token sellers outside the United States.
Continue Reading Key Takeaways From the Tezos Litigation

On July 18, 2018, the Financial Action Task Force[1] (“FATF”), published its report to the July 2018 G20 Finance Ministers and Central Bank Governors’ meeting.[2] The report sets out FATF’s ongoing work to fight money laundering and terrorist financing, and in particular FATF’s work programme on virtual currencies, including the money laundering and

The SEC is targeting ICOs once again, but it is now adding more focus through its new Enforcement Division Cyber Unit.

  • In its enforcement settlement with Munchee, Inc., the SEC looked past the utility of a “utility token” in its “securities” analysis and instead focused on aspects such as marketing and the existence of a

On July 25, 2017, the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) released groundbreaking materials relating to blockchain tokens. These materials provide significant and welcome insight to the SEC’s and its staff’s thinking in this area, although they leave a number of important questions unanswered.

The SEC released a detailed investigative report under Section 21(a)

Recently, there has been growing interest in whether, and in what circumstances, crypto-tokens may constitute “investment contracts” under the U.S. Supreme Court’s Howey test, rendering them securities subject to regulation in the United States.  The following resources take a deep dive into that issue, exploring the structural, marketing and other key considerations that may make crypto-tokens more or less likely to be securities under Howey.  As these resources demonstrate, the Howey test is highly fact-dependent, indicating that certain crypto-tokens may be securities under Howey whereas others – if properly designed – may not.


Continue Reading Resources on Crypto-Tokens and Securities Law

On March 29, 2017, Perkins Coie partner Dax Hansen and associate Josh Boehm were invited to the Cyber Initiative at Stanford Law School to deliver a presentation on several cutting-edge legal issues relating to blockchain technology.  Their presentation, which focused on blockchain token sales and treatment of bitcoin under property law, is available here.